Energy & Environment

Fishing at the end of Energy East

The story of one fisherman fighting a very big pipeline
Screen capture

In part two of this three-part series documenting the stories of Energy East, photojournalist Robert van Waarden casts off with fisherman David Thompson and sails the Bay of Fundy to capture the sights and sounds of his way of life.

But more than the images, it’s the story of David which captivates. Thompson worries the new Energy East pipeline will leak, and he questions the logic of major investments in oil infrastructure when we know the future of our society lies elsewhere.

On May 30, residents of Saint John will join others in Atlantic Canada, including Indigenous people from the Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet), Passamaquoddy and Mi'kmaq, to march to the end of the proposed Energy East pipeline and draw a line in the sand.

The protest in New Brunswick kicks off a summer of climate-related actions across Canada, including a national day of action called We > Tar Sands on July 4 and a march for jobs, justice and the climate in Toronto on July 5.

Part one of this report, focusing on the residents of Red Head, where the pipeline’s terminal will be located, was published last week. A Ricochet exclusive, this series was produced with the support of 350.org and the Council of Canadians.

Watch for part three later this week on Ricochet.

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