Energy & Environment

VIDEO: ‘It’s not if there’s a leak, it’s when’: Energy East vs. the Wolastoqiyik people

Screen capture

In part three of a series documenting the stories at the end of the proposed Energy East pipeline, photojournalist Robert van Waarden meets Alma Brooks, a Wolastoqiyik clan mother from St. Mary’s in New Brunswick.

“The Energy East pipeline is threatening the entire length of our territory,” explains Brooks, “because it’s not if there’s a leak, it’s when there’s a leak.”

On May 30, residents of Saint John will join others in Atlantic Canada, including Indigenous people from the Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet), Passamaquoddy and Mi’kmaq, to march to the end of the proposed pipeline and draw a line in the sand.

The protest in New Brunswick kicks off a summer of climate-related actions across Canada, including a national day of action called We > Tar Sands on July 4 and a march for jobs, justice and the climate in Toronto on July 5.

Part one of this report, focusing on the residents of Red Head, where the pipeline’s terminal will be located, was published last week. Part two, the story of fisher David Thompson, was released on Monday.

A Ricochet exclusive, this series was produced with the support of 350.org and the Council of Canadians.

Your ad here
Don't like ads?
Automated ads help us pay our journalists, servers, and team. Support us by becoming a member today to hide all automated ads:
Become a member
You might also be interested in...
The rise of the far right
Why Canada’s white supremacists want Doug Ford to win
May 24, 2018
Award-winning journalism
The invisible wall: Hong Kong’s refugees
Olivia Cheng
May 15, 2018
#Gamerhate
Death-squad-promoting white supremacist exposed as Ottawa gamer
Erin Seatter
June 14, 2018